Raising the Voice of the African Decade of the Disabled Persons

rehab title

Training Emerging Leaders in the Disability Community, Promoting Disability Rights and Developing HIV/AIDS Awareness and Prevention Programs for Adolescents and Young Adults with Disabilities in Africa

With the financial support of the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), Rehabilitation International, in partnership with the Disabled Organisation for Legal Affairs and Social Economic Development (DOLASED), Miracles in Mozambique (MIM) and Prof. Nora Groce of Yale University, carried out a project targeting adolescents and young adults with disabilities in Tanzania and Mozambique focused on HIV/AIDS, leadership and human rights education.

The project produced three main outputs:

  • Increased enjoyment of disability rights for the full participation, equality and empowerment of persons with disabilities in Africa through more inclusive national legislation and partnerships among key actors;
  • Disability rights and HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention education materials and training manuels in accessible formats designed for adolescents and young adults with disabilities in Africa, with special emphasis on young women with disabilities; and
  • Disability rights and HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention training model for emerging adult leaders from the disability community and for HIV/AIDS outreach workers.

RI Project - African Decade

 

The main goal of this project was to build the capacity of emerging leaders from the disability community and of HIV/AIDS outreach workers in Tanzania and Mozambique through the development of aceesible educaitonal and training materials on disability rights and HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention. Emphasis was placed on disability-specific human rights issues, as well as HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention materials that address the particular needs of adolescents and young adults with disabilities. The  primary beneficiaries of this project were adolescents and young adults with disabilities (ages 12 – 30) of both genders, collaborating HIV/AIDS outreach workers and emerging adult leaders from disability community in Tanzania and Mozambique. There was a particular focus on ensuring that at least 50% of participants in all activities were young women.

 “It is high time for mainstream HIV/AIDS organisation like UMATI to mainstream disability issues and include persons with disabilities in their core functions and programmes.  All people – disabled and non disabled –  need to have access to information on HIV/AIDS.”   UMATI staff member, Tanzania